FWF hoses, Oil door pin airfoil, and exhaust update

Most of the FWF fuel and oil hoses are complete now minus some Adel clamps that still need to be added. I’ve tried to annotate the pictures as much as possible to help show what all the hoses are.

Below you can see the main fuel supply comes out of the firewall bulkhead fitting on the left (pilots) side and attaches to the SDS post filter. In this picture is also one of the two oil cooler lines that connects to the engine.

Below is the closeup of the post filter clamped to the engine mount.

The fuel supply comes out of the post filter and continues on to the fuel rail after it passes through the baffling. Also shown is the fuel pressure line that comes back to a sensor, the other oil cooler line, and the oil pressure line.

A better view of both lines coming out of the oil cooler.

The blue hose is the oil breather line connected to the Air/Oil separator. This configuration will keep oil off the belly of the airplane. I also added an adel clamp on the firewall to hold it midway.

Moving to the other side of the engine, we have the manifold pressure line coming from the sensor on the manifold block. You can also see here the fuel return line coming through the baffling as it makes its way back to the fuel pressure regulator.

One of the add-ons I decided on was a remote oil filter adapter. This will make oil changes much easier with the filter readily accessible and with the filter oriented vertical, all excess oil will be in the filter when you spin it off preventing a mess. This does, however, require 2 additional hoses to get back and forth to the engine as shown here.

Below you see the Borla pressure regulator for the SDS system mounted to the firewall and taking return fuel (top right) from the engine, and returning it to the firewall mounted bulkhead fitting below the heat box on the right (copilots) side. I still need to attach a manifold line to the center of the regulator.

Looking at the engine side and the fuel block on top of the case.. you can see the supply, return, and pressure lines as they make their way from the rear baffle to the block. There is a T fitting in the supply inlet to provide the pressure back to the sensor.

Each of the cylinder is fed out of the sides of the fuel block like the 3 cylinders shown below.

I also drilled a small hole in the oil filter adapter to attach safety wire to when safetying the oil filter itself.. not done here as the install is all temporary for now.

One of the other things I needed to finish up as creating an airfoil of sorts to back up the pin for the hidden oil door. I used some air-drying modeling clay to form the shape that I wanted.

I then laid up a few layers of fiberglass cloth over the clay and allowed it to cure overnight.

I finished it off with some micro and sanded it smooth.

With the pin inserted.

Another task I needed to figure out was how to feed air into the left side heat muff. With the AC compressor installed on the engine there is no good way to use anything from the air inlet area like the stock setup does. The only options I saw were to feed it from the aft baffle (like the right side does), feed it from the left intake snorkel, pull from the right inlet area (but this is also tight with the alternator over there), or add NACA vents to the lower cowl.

I’ve decided on pulling from the left intake snorkel. This does steal some combustion air , but the Showplane’s setup is designed to only need air from one side to be sufficient. So I will add a 2″ SCAT tube between the locations shown with arrows below. Of course, I’m going to need to get a 180* setup for the #2 cylinder heat muff from Custom Aircraft parts instead of the normal 62.5* one I have now. This will have air come in from the outside of the exhaust and intake tubes to the engine and the outlet will be on the inside of those tubes feeding the left heat box.

A rough mock-up of where the 2″ SCAT tube will go. There seems to be sufficient space between the lower cowl and the engine to do this.

A rough approximation of where the inlet to the heat muff will be.

In talking to Clinton about this, he’s also been fighting some cracking in the exhaust on the left side. He had previously sent me a support setup for the exhaust to help with vibration, which I have, but haven’t done anything with it quite yet. He asked that I install my exhaust and check for any interference with the intake tubes and in the end, I’ll need to send my entire left side of the exhaust back to him for modification to help prevent cracking in the future.

Left side of exhaust installed.
Right side installed.

While sending it back, I’m also going to have him “stud” the heat muffs on both sides (as shown below) to allow for some better heat transfer. I didn’t know about this option prior to ordering and it apparently helps get some more heat for the colder months. The stock Vetterman exhaust is known to have too much heat, but that’s not always the case with the Custom system.

Picture of Bob Lusslow’s studded exhaust that I’m going to have done.

Fuel filter/cabin line redo plus FWF plumbing starts

Back when I installed my fuel lines, Tom from AS Flightlines ( http://www.aircraftspecialty.com) really only had one solution to the SDS fuel filters. On top of the fuel pump module using adel clamps. I really don’t like having these in the tunnel for maintenance reasons. It seems inevitable that some amount of fuel will spill out into the tunnel no matter how careful I am trying to catch it all as I take this all apart for yearly service. Additionally, I placed the access panels on the tunnel sidewalls a little further aft and not perfectly aligned to the whole assembly, so access to the forward-most fittings is a bit challenging. Taking the top of the tunnel off, while doable, is a royal pain seeing there are throttle cables, etc.. routed on top of that. I really have always viewed this solution as something I’m going to regret and will spend way more time than I really should on each condition inspection. Also I can envision lots of curse words being used. Below is a view of the original filter setup in the tunnel.

Original tunnel fuel filter arrangement.

Since that time, Tom has come up with pre-filters in the wing roots, and moving the post filter firewall forward. Despite having some re-do.. I opted to take some time now to change and use this new configuration. Maintenance will be much easier and more accessible that way. If fuel does spill, it’ll be outside of the cabin. With just the fuel pump in the tunnel, there will be basically no reason to ever go in there very often at all, other than to remove the access panels and check on the pumps.

Of course that meant all new cabin hoses and some additional expense, but Tom actually helped out in this regard. I also went with some other arrangements that Tom has standardized on for routing, like having the supply come out on the left side of the firewall and return on the right. One thing that we did decide on was seeing we had to remake the hoses under my seats, was to re-use the hole I had already cut for one of the fuel lines. I cut this hole pretty close to the stock supply hose location and sided it just big enough to get a -6 hose swivel fitting through. Seeing both the stock and hole I drilled were too big for normal AN bulkhead fittings, I had to utilize the TCW fittings (https://www.tcwtech.com). Bob has come up with a washer with a neck/bushing on the inside that fits into the 1″ stock location so the fitting doesn’t fall through the hole. I also asked Bob if he could make me a custom one for the 25/32″ hole that I had already drilled. He made it the next day and had it off to me. I’d say I had a bit of shit luck with how these 2 washers fit basically perfectly. I really figured I was going to have to carve a half moon in one of them for clearance to the other.

Supply and return fittings on the fuselage side skin.

I installed 2 new hoses under each seat for the supply and return.

Below you can see the routing to the side skins. In retrospect, I really wish I didn’t route my brake line in the middle row of the systems brackets.. It would minimize hose crossovers.. In the end the right-most hose in the picture below passes under the brake hose with some clearance. The left-most hose is angled enough with the 45* fitting that it also clears everything.

Routing of hose lines to side skin.

I then spent some time re-locating the pump module. I used the “standard” length hoses from Tom to place this. I also noticed that I needed to raise the module up 2″ from the 3/4″x3/4″ angle I had placed on the tunnel sidewalls already.

Using the hose lengths to place the pump module.

In order to raise the module up, I decided on using some square aluminum tubing. I could some 2″x2″x.125″ material on Aircraft Spruce and ended up cutting 2 pieces. I re-used one set of holes and nut plates I already had on the angle for the aft-most tube. I then added 2 new pieces of angle for the forward tube as shown below.

Using square tubing to elevate the pump module 2″

I was then able to bolt the pump module down with 4 bolts into the square tubing with nut plates and AN3 bolts. I added a couple of adel clamps to the longer return hose as it made its way back to the selector valve.

Finalized pump module

Tom also sent along my FWF package with integral firesleeved hoses.

Example of the integral fire sleeve hose

I started on the fuel supply and routing it from the firewall to the post-filter to the fuel block on the top of the engine. This hose passes through the aft baffle with a grommet.

FW to post filter hose.
Post filter location on engine mount vertical tube and routing through baffle
Supply hose to fuel supply rail on engine top. The T fitting is for fuel pressure back to the manifold block on the firewall.

More FWF plumbing to come now that the cabin and pump are complete.

Completely baffled

In prep for installing the baffle material, I used my go-to method of using construction paper to make templates for each piece prior to cutting the actual material. I targeted 2.5″ above the metal baffle material based on what others have done. I did a few test fits with the upper cowling on to make sure that length seemed like it would work. I tied to make the pieces overlap around the split points in the metal in case I ever need to take the whole assembly apart at a later time.

Tempates for baffle material
Working my way around the engine.
Another view
All done with templates.

I then marked the templates with a line along the metal baffles to mark their position for reinstallation later on. I also marked out a line with enough edge distance for drilling 1/8″ holes to pop rivet the baffling material to later.

Once that was done, I removed the templates and cut out the material one piece at a time. I tried to cut such that the natural curve from the material roll would be in the direction I wanted the material to lay.

Cutting the first piece.
Test fitting it in place
Inboard view
First couple of pieces done.

The method I found worked the best to punch holes in the baffle material was to first tape the template on the piece.

template taped in place

I then used the previously drawn line to place the template/piece assembly in place relative to the metal baffle making sure I had enough material for the overlap spots to the adjacent piece. I would use a drill to cut away the construction paper enough to mark the spot of the hole to be punched. I did the first 2 holes, then punched holes.. put the piece back into place with clecos and then drilled the remainder of the holes so I didn’t have to try to hold the assembly in position for the entire sequence.

Drilling away the construction paper at the hole location
All holes marked with the drill.

I then used a punch to make the hole in the proper spot in the silicone baffle material.

Punching the holes in the baffle material at the proper locations.

Below are some pics of the final install. I did have to take some of the curl out of these pieces as they tended to curl inwards a little too much. I rolled each piece by hand in the opposite direction and sat some weight on the pieces to take some of the curl out. I also used some duct tape to hold adjacent pieces somewhat together. This will simulate the eventual RTV that will be used to hold everything together.

Closeup of Prop Governor area.

I then did something similar to the plans for the stock cowl to bridge the gap between the air intake tubes and the cowl. I used the metal strip material provided and curved it to match the round intake shape of the cowling. I then matched drilled 3 holes for #6 screws to hold this to the cowl. I cut some additional baffle material and used contact cement to adhere to the metal strips.

Metal strips formed to cowl curve with baffle material adhered to it.
View of lower cowl with baffle material added.

Below is a picture of the iniital test fit of this strip/baffle material fit. It seals up the small gap between the cowling and the intake tubes by resting on the inside of the air intake tube. I’ll likely trim this piece a little more for a better fit. Note also that I was sort of holding this in position to take a picture so the alignment is a little off, but you get the gist of what I am trying to accomplish here.

Baffle trimming and intake ramp finishing

In order to get the top cowling back on, the baffle needed to be trimmed. I saw two ways to do this, and I ended up sort of using both. I started by elevating the top cowl 6″ above the lower cowl. Care was taken to make sure it was aligned both fore, aft, left, and right to the bottom cowl. I just used some pieces of scrap wood and clamps that I had lying around on each corner on the outside of the cowl. I measured in multiple locations along the horizontal split to be sure I was satisfied before moving on.

Cowl elevated 6″
More of a front view.

I then made a tool out of a tongue depressor and an aluminum block I had. I taped a sharpie to the bottom of the block and adjusted the stick to get exactly 6″ from pen to top of the stick. I didn’t take any pictures, but the idea here is that you have enough room (with the 6″ elevation) to get your hands/arms inside to hold the stick at a 90 degree angle with the sharpie along the inside of the baffle. Holding the stick on the inside of the upper cowl, you move it aft tracing the contour of the top cowl onto the baffle which will serve as a trim line.

I then trimmed to that line. That basically got me to flush. One could certainly add some extra to the length of the stick to get the the gap you’d like to achieve. Instead, once the initial trim was done, I utilized the 2nd method of paper clips all along the baffles. You barely stick them on and then place the top cowl into position. They slide downward and give you an exact indication of how much gap you have at that location to the top cowl.

Paperclips in position to measure gap

Below you can see the results of the first attempt. You’re shooting for somewhere between 12/32″ and 16/32″ gap per the plans. At each paperclip location, I wrote the number of 32’nds needed to get to 12/32″ by measuring how high each paperclip was above the edge of the baffle.

Measuring current gap

Those measurements basically were used to draw a new trim line.

Marking a more precise trim line.

I ended up doing this for a couple of cycles until I was completely satisfied with the gap all the way around. Making smaller adjustments in specific areas as I went. Below isn’t the best picture, but it was the results of the baffle trimming with a gap to the top cowl.

I fabricated the clips and drilled them into position per the plans. I’m holding off riveting most of this stuff until later.

Now that the baffles were trimmed, I decided it was time to affix the top cowl inlet ramps. I placed them into position with clecos and some scrap metal strip to hold them in place at the front.

I then test fit the cowl and had to trim the outer side baffles more to account for the curvature. I did get somewhat lucky due to my cowl being so far forward based on my prop/spinner setup compared to most. The ramps didn’t require trimming at the prop governor to at least test fit. I did end up trimming around to give some more clearance, which I’ll foam in later to provide a good backing for baffle material.

No initial trimming required for prop governor.

Once I was happy with their location, I epoxied them into place. Later I will layup some cloth, but for now just epoxy to hold them in position. I also did a single layer of cloth and some peel ply on the inlet circle just to hold that area into position.

Epoxy ramps into place.
1 temp layer of tape with peel ply on the outside.

I then laid up 3-4 layers of cloth for the underside of the circular inlet.. Placed that into position and let it cure. I sanded down the outside area and added micro. Once that was cured, I sanded to a smooth finish.

Right inlet ramp micro’ed
Same on left side.
Cutout for prop governor

With the upper ramps completed enough for now, I moved on to customizing the center baffles. I started with the right side, seeing it’s the easier side without compressor interference to deal with. I cut the stock baffle leaving just enough flange to rivet a new piece that would angle toward the inboard side of the inlet. I first made a template from construction paper and got it as close as I could. I transferred to metal and worked on trimming to get a good gap to the upper inlet ramps.

Paper template of right side.
Transfer template to metal and test fit.

I then spent some iterations trimming this custom piece to match the curvature of the upper inlet ramp with some gap for baffle material. Below are the results.

Right center baffle gap.

To hold the inboard side in place I fabricated up some 3/4″ x 0.125″ Angle. Seeing there was a slight bend in the baffle I just created near the inlet, I marked a cut to match that bend in the angle. I marked and cut out a “V”

Marking the cut to bend the angle
Cut made.
Bending the angle to match the bend in the baffle.

Below is the end result after match drilling and cleco’ing the baffle to the angle.

I utilized 3 screws to tie the aft piece of metal holding the carbon fiber ramp to the front pieces, including the piece of metal that runs under the carbon fiber ramp. I trimmed the excess away on the inboard side of any carbon fiber and metal plate so it didn’t protrude past the angle.

I then did a similar thing using a template on the left side. I decided to use one piece of metal to wrap around the governor and bend around the AC compressor belt to box it out of the inlet area.

Beginnings of a paper template

Once I was satisfied with the paper template, I transferred it onto metal, cut it out, and made the needed bends as shown below.

Initial trim of the custom left baffle.
A front view.

I then worked to fabricate another short piece of angle with a notch cut out for AC belt clearance to hold the inboard side in place. I drilled 2 holes for #6 screws to attach to the stock baffle that I had cut off and left a bit of a flange for connecting my custom piece to.

View of left ramp area with baffles screwed together and cleco’ed to the angle
Front view showing the angle and 2 #8 screws holding it in position, allowing clearance for the AC belt.
View of the finished up left ramp area.
Both ramp areas complete (beside riveting everything).
Final picture with top cowling in place.

This was a lot of work!

Intake part 2

Now that the basic shape of the left intake tube was formed, it was time to sand it down to perfect shape. I used mostly the Permagrit sanding blocks for this task, and it was relatively easy. Of course, at some points I had to put the lower cowl on to make sure I had clearance to it. I also carved out a bit more in the back for the AC hose connections to the compressor.

Foam sanded to shape

I then laid up 4 layers of cloth and put some peel ply over the top and let the tube cure overnight.

Of course prior to doing this I covered the foam in packing tape as a release agent and also sprayed some silicone based release agent on that for good measure.

Once cured, I removed all the foam inside of the tube and test fit it.

I then cut some cloth to close out the top part of the tube where I had cut for clearance to the compressor. 4 layers again were laid up and peel ply placed over the top.

Closing out the top of the tube.

Once cured I test fit the tube once again to make sure things looked good. below you can see the blue sharpie lines that I used to mark the cloth for cutting pieces to shape.

Tube clearance to compressor
Aft view of bump in for AC hose connections
Closer look at the bump-in.

Then it was time to wrap a single piece of cloth to span the gap between the two tubes to join them back together. You can see the black line I marked for alignment. I also used a jack to allow the tube to sit on vs. having gravity pull down on the tube while this was curing. I used a single layer on the outside, because clearance to the cowl is a bit tight. Once this cured, I placed a thick layer of flox on the inside of the tube to fill the gap and create more strength in this area.

re-joining the tubes.
Complete except for some sanding.

One of the other tasks that needed to be done was to redesign the air ramps seeing I’m using the Showplane’s cowling and the stock metal ramps were cut out for this intake system. I fabricated a .032″ thick piece wide enough to go under the baffle angle and still protrude enough to serve as a flange for the new ramp. This will be bent downward somewhat depending on the angle between this and the from of the intake. It’ll provide a nice flat surface for attaching the ramp material to with screws.

I also bent up some of the side baffle material to provide 1 screw location. I also decided to fabricate up a metal piece that sits up front on top of the intake area. It has a bent flange that will rivet to the side baffle material. I’ve left everything to the inside (closest to the flywheel) long for now. Once I get the center baffles completely figured out this area will be trimmed and I suspect some aluminum angle will be used with some screws to connect the front metal piece to the aft piece I made with screws.

Picture of ramp area prep for screws and carbon fiber ramps.

I then cut some carbon fiber material I bought for the ramps to fit in the ramp area. Again, leaving the inboard side long for now.

Test fit right ramp material

I then match drilled everything, added nut plates, and screws to hold everything down.

Right Ramp.

I put the center baffle material in place after cutting it somewhat. This will need to be angled back towards the intake opening. In fact, I may cut the piece coming out towards the flywheel and rivet in a new piece of my own at an angle to achieve this.

Right Center baffle piece in place

I really had to trim away the left center baffle piece. It interferes with the AC compressor quite a bit. So I decided to cut the forward most section completely off, leaving enough material to rivet more metal to later, and also the notch for the aft part of the prop governor. Later, I’ll work on a custom piece to go over the prop governor and along the ramp to the intake area.

Working on the Left center baffle
Match drilling the hole for the 2 center baffles.

The same process was repeated for the left, with the exception that the compressor complicates the ramp..

Metal flange for ramp added

I decided the best way was to use construction paper to create template prior to attempting to cut the carbon fiber piece.

Creating a template
Transferring template to carbon fiber.
Ramp cut and in place.
Another angle
Bending up the side baffle for a screw location.
Ramp in place!
Another view. Looks like a #6 nutplate made it into my #8 bin.. I’ll have to fix that at some point..
All finished up with the left center baffle in place.

Cowl Baffles

Now that the main part of the cowl is fitted, it was time to move onto getting the baffling started.

The start of section FF2 of the plans.

You start off by marking up the #6 cylinder baffle for the scat tube that’ll go to the oil cooler. Also some holes for the top spark plug wires to pass through. Below you see the flange located in place and some holes drilled per plans.

The inner and outer circles were marked. The inner circle was cut out to allow air to flow through to the oil cooler.

Holes for oil cooler and plug wires cut

The entire #6 assembly is then all riveted together.

A similar thing was done for the #5 baffle. The one thing I did different here was to utilize the RV-14 baffle modification. This provides more space between the aft-most cylinder fins and the baffling to get cooling air through and avoids doing “the washer trick” that several refer to.

It’s key to do this prior to cutting the 2” duct hole as it will need to move up.

I started by cutting off the existing piece of the baffle that wraps around the cylinder.

Cut off baffle piece

I then put the CB-00028, CB-00029, and CB-00030 pieces I ordered from Van’s in place of the wrap around piece that was cut off.

Below you can see that I relocated the 2” duct hole a little higher up on the baffle compared to the plans.

Baffle #5 complete

I worked on adding the doublers on the other baffle pieces only to end up with a pile of baffle parts ready to trim, as needed, to fit around my valve covers.

I worked on fitting the #5 and #6 cylinder baffles in place and putting on the Aerosport engine mount covers. 3 #6 screws were used with nut plates to attach making sure to not drill into the mounting ears.

Below the baffling is complete, yet to be trimmed.

In anticipation of starting on the Showplanes intake I temporarily installed the exhaust pipes.

Right side exhaust pipes in place
Left side pipes

I also worked on making sure my AC compressor was as close to final position as possible. It’s a bunch of tweaking with a couple of different belt lengths, mounting spacers, and arm lengths, to get it all right. There is very little space between the belt tensioner and the starter.

AC compressor and prop governor in place
Minimal spacing between tensioner and starter.

Engine is Hung!

Prior to hanging the engine a few odds and ends needed to be completed which are just easier to do beforehand.

One of those things was adding an angle to the top of the oil cooler mount for the oversized oil cooler. The oil cooler itself needed to have some of its flanges cut to fit around the engine mounts.. Then the angle was cut to length and riveted to the the oil cooler mount. I bolted the bottom bolts into place and drilled holes into the angle for the top 3 bolts.

The end result after ordering long bolts and making some compression tubes to the right length with washers.

I also needed to safety wire the coil pack mounts to the mag cover plates.

Then came time to install the engine. I used the bucket forks and my tractor to lift the pallet up high enough to get the hoists legs under it.

Then with the hoist connected, I unbolted the engine ears and flywheel from the pallet and lifted the engine up.

The first 2 bolts (top) are the easy ones..

Then it’s a matter of getting the 3rd bolt in, which was a little trickier, but not bad.. The 4th bolt took a bit to get lined up… after a bunch of playing I was able to get the bolt started through the hole and a socket to keep threading it in. Then the engine hoist was removed..

A couple of pics of me with the engine..

Engine Has Arrived!!

I was supposed to go to Aero Sport Power in Kamloops, British Columbia to help build my engine the week of April 19th, but that didn’t happen with the state of the world and the Canadian boarder still being closed. So instead they built my engine for me and have invited me to come at a later time for the experience when things are better. I plan to take them up on that offer. I won’t be building my engine, but it’ll still be the same engine.

After making the final payment, I received tracking info and had been watching it make its way across Canada and into NY. Seeing this was a freight company and a residential lift gate delivery.. I expected to get a call when the crate arrived at the regional distro center to schedule a delivery..

I’m currently working 50% from home and 50% from the office and it was my turn to be in the office.. I refreshed tracking around 10am and saw the crate was out for delivery… YIKES!! I’m at least 30 minutes away.. I quickly called the company to confirm and they said he should be there sometime around noon.. Fortunately, I had enough time to get home and get the tractor ready with the bucket forks in case I needed them to move the crate up to the garage.

The driver called when he was a few miles out and asked if I was home because he had noticed it wasn’t a scheduled item… I told him I was and what happened and he confirmed that they should have called me..

Happy I caught it in time to be there for the delivery. Seeing the crate was already on a pallet jack, the driver was nice enough to wheel it up my 600+ft driveway and into the garage for me.

Engine crate
I think I’ll take the plastic off.. 🙂

Below is a picture of the rear of the engine. Here you can see the secondary alternator in the upper right. The Airwolf remote oil filter adapter in a deep gold color below and to the left of the alternator. I will place the oil filter on the firewall in a more convenient place for draining the oil with hoses running back and forth to here. Note that the round gold covers with 3 holes in the middle cover the standard spot for magnetos to go. I’m using the SDS EFII system and these will house the ignition coils packs instead. Below the left-most magneto cover, there’s a sort of triangular shaped cover for where the engine based fuel pump goes. Again not needed with the SDS EFII system, so it is capped off. There are also various oil connections to and from the oil cooler, breather tube, sensors, and to connect the Barrett Cold air sump.

Rear view

A top view of the engine. Here you can see the SDS fuel rail mounted on top of the case split and the plumbing to each cylinder injector. I may later decide to move to a fuel block on the rear part of the engine baffling and route the runs to each cylinder from there. You can also see the white electrical wires that are the 2 (redundant) hall effect sensors that sense the location of the crank. This is done with small magnets that have been installed in the flywheel at specific positions so the ECU can know the relative position of where the engine is in its combustion cycle. The unfortunate thing is going with AC, I need to use a different flywheel that has 2 pully grooves, so I’ll have to get a new magnet set, drill holes in the flywheel and install per the SDS instructions.

And a couple of side pics

Right side view
Left side view

It is truly a thing of beauty!

Here are the full specs:

Aero Sport Power New Engine Kit IO-540-EXP Includes:

Factory New Lycoming Cylinders (Ported and Polished), SDS High Energy Ignition and Electronic Fuel
Injection with Dual ECU, Harness, Spark Plugs, Sky-Tec Light Weight Starter, Roller Tappet Camshaft and
Lifters, Oil Sump, B&C 60 Amp Primary and 30 Amp Stand by Externally Regulated Alternators, Full Tanis
Preheat System, Connecting Rods, Balanced Counterweighted Crankshaft, Crankcase, Ring Gear, Inner
Cylinder Baffles, Dipstick and Tube, Airwolf Remote Spin on Oil Filter Adapter (without oil hoses), Vacuum
Pump Adapter Housing. The engine was painted a 2 tone graphite and black. Additional upgrades:

  • 9:1 Cylinder compression ratio
  • Barrett Cold Air Induction sump.

Unfortunately Aero Sport doesn’t Dyno their engines, so I’m not sure how much horsepower this baby makes, but with the 9:1 compression ratio, the Cold Air Induction, and the port/polished cylinders I expect somewhere in the 280-300HP range over the 260HP stock IO-540-D4A5 engine.

Now to finish up the gear pants and leg fairings so I can get this mounted.